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Leadership

Friend? Or Faux?

Friend?  Or Faux?
Friend? Or Faux?

Human interaction is something that we cannot, or let me say should not, avoid.  We hear people referred to as “an island” or a “recluse”, mostly not as positive traits, but more often than not used with a negative connotation.  We also hear the classic examples of people retreating and withdrawing from society like Theodore “Ted” Kaczynski, aka, the Unabomber.  He was a child prodigy, who grew up in suburban Chicago.  He was an exceptionally bright student at Harvard, but within a few years, isolated himself from the rest of society, and moved to Montana, where he lived a “self-sustaining” life.  Needless to say, he went on to become infamous, for sending bombs to people (which resulted in 3 deaths and over 20 injuries) through the mail.

I’m sure there was a whole lot more going on in the brilliant mind of Kaczynski (beyond just becoming a recluse) that led to his acts of terror, but this is just one example, of many, where seemingly rational individuals withdraw from other human interaction, and go on to do rather irrational things.

There are certain traits that come to my mind that enhance the effectiveness of our leadership, as well as basic human interaction.  No doubt we are constantly feeling the pressure to conform to what society says is the norm, or acceptable.  Yet, there is a need now, more than ever, for real, genuine people to lead both in the public and private sector, in homes, churches, communities and schools.  Thus, the title, friend?  or faux?  Faux is just a fancy word for fake, or something that is not real.  Maybe you’ve purchased a faux plant.  Those are generally the kind of plants that I can keep around for more than two days!  “Real” plants are sometimes tough to manage.  In fact, they require a lot of daily attention and care, but faux?  You can get away with not caring for faux plants.

Plants are one thing, but people are entirely another.  I’m on a campaign to get people to just open up and be themselves.  Not at the expense of hurting, offending or abusing others, but to help create a culture where people can be confident in themselves, and accepting of others.  So, I have compiled a short list of desirable, yet difficult traits that we certainly could use more of.

  1. Vulnerability
  2. Transparency
  3. Honesty
  4. Loyalty
  5. Honor
  6. Respect

Stay tuned, and we will continue on in future posts, unpacking these traits.  I would certainly love to hear from some of you, with your thoughts on additional traits and characteristics that we’d all like to see more of.

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